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BitCoins y nuevos modelos de intercambio

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Re: BitCoins y nuevos modelos de intercambio

Notapor Dr.House » Mar Jul 25, 2017 9:43 am

Tio Rico escribió:
Dr.House escribió:Bitcoin platform scores key greenlight from Wall Street regulator
By Mark DeCambre
Published: July 24, 2017 6:13 p.m. ET
The Commodity Futures Trading Commission on Monday granted a license to an entity to serve as a derivative-trading platform for bitcoin BTCUSD, +0.08% and other cybercurrencies like Ethereum's ether. The CFTC approved New York-based LedgerX to provide clearing services for options and derivatives pegged to the nascent cryptocurrency market--a regulatory approval that could potentially expand trading in bitcoin and other such currencies. According to Reuters, Ledger Holdings, the parent of LedgerX, raised about $11 million in funding from groups including Miami International Holdings Inc. and China's Huiyin Blockchain Venture Investments to help run its clearing business. About $1.5 million was raised from funders led by Google Ventures and Lightspeed Venture Partners, Reuters reported. Monday's CFTC approval comes about four months after the SEC rejected a proposal by twins Tyler and Cameroon Winklevoss for a bitcoin exchange-traded fund. For LedgerX's part, the startup, which has been seeking a bitcoin derivatives license for years, is expected to begin its operation by offering so-called put and call options, which are contracts that grant the owners the right, but not the obligation to buy and sell an underlying asset at designated price and time. On Monday, a single bitcoin was trading at $2,768, up fractionally on the day.

Muy buena info Dr House, vos estás invertido en BTC, si es así, como ves la actualización de la moneda me refiero al Segwit2x, saludos!


No estoy invertido en BTC pq no encontre forma de hacerlo mas o menos formal.
Si estoy invertido en los chips mineros de BTC (AMD y NVDA).
Por lo demas me parece que el potencial es enorme el blockchain es una tecnologia disruptiva.
Saludos
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BitCoins y nuevos modelos de intercambio

Notapor Sr fangote » Lun Jul 24, 2017 11:17 pm

Una moneda para que no pierda la UNIDAD DE CAMBIO debe tener poca volatilidad (mínimo en el mediano y largo plazo) ya que sino no se podría trocar la mercadería real en función de esta.
Aquí hay que debatir si más que una moneda no es un reducto perfecto para la timba. Porque si con Bitcoin quiero comprar algo de la realidad cuantos bitcoin debo poner si cotiza al % que sea con una variación grande las 24 hs?
Hay propiedades que tiene una moneda que se van degradando por la volatilidad independientemente que suba o no.
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Re: BitCoins y nuevos modelos de intercambio

Notapor Tio Rico » Lun Jul 24, 2017 8:40 pm

Dr.House escribió:Bitcoin platform scores key greenlight from Wall Street regulator
By Mark DeCambre
Published: July 24, 2017 6:13 p.m. ET
The Commodity Futures Trading Commission on Monday granted a license to an entity to serve as a derivative-trading platform for bitcoin BTCUSD, +0.08% and other cybercurrencies like Ethereum's ether. The CFTC approved New York-based LedgerX to provide clearing services for options and derivatives pegged to the nascent cryptocurrency market--a regulatory approval that could potentially expand trading in bitcoin and other such currencies. According to Reuters, Ledger Holdings, the parent of LedgerX, raised about $11 million in funding from groups including Miami International Holdings Inc. and China's Huiyin Blockchain Venture Investments to help run its clearing business. About $1.5 million was raised from funders led by Google Ventures and Lightspeed Venture Partners, Reuters reported. Monday's CFTC approval comes about four months after the SEC rejected a proposal by twins Tyler and Cameroon Winklevoss for a bitcoin exchange-traded fund. For LedgerX's part, the startup, which has been seeking a bitcoin derivatives license for years, is expected to begin its operation by offering so-called put and call options, which are contracts that grant the owners the right, but not the obligation to buy and sell an underlying asset at designated price and time. On Monday, a single bitcoin was trading at $2,768, up fractionally on the day.

Muy buena info Dr House, vos estás invertido en BTC, si es así, como ves la actualización de la moneda me refiero al Segwit2x, saludos!
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Re: BitCoins y nuevos modelos de intercambio

Notapor Dr.House » Lun Jul 24, 2017 8:18 pm

Bitcoin platform scores key greenlight from Wall Street regulator
By Mark DeCambre
Published: July 24, 2017 6:13 p.m. ET
The Commodity Futures Trading Commission on Monday granted a license to an entity to serve as a derivative-trading platform for bitcoin BTCUSD, +0.08% and other cybercurrencies like Ethereum's ether. The CFTC approved New York-based LedgerX to provide clearing services for options and derivatives pegged to the nascent cryptocurrency market--a regulatory approval that could potentially expand trading in bitcoin and other such currencies. According to Reuters, Ledger Holdings, the parent of LedgerX, raised about $11 million in funding from groups including Miami International Holdings Inc. and China's Huiyin Blockchain Venture Investments to help run its clearing business. About $1.5 million was raised from funders led by Google Ventures and Lightspeed Venture Partners, Reuters reported. Monday's CFTC approval comes about four months after the SEC rejected a proposal by twins Tyler and Cameroon Winklevoss for a bitcoin exchange-traded fund. For LedgerX's part, the startup, which has been seeking a bitcoin derivatives license for years, is expected to begin its operation by offering so-called put and call options, which are contracts that grant the owners the right, but not the obligation to buy and sell an underlying asset at designated price and time. On Monday, a single bitcoin was trading at $2,768, up fractionally on the day.
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Re: BitCoins y nuevos modelos de intercambio

Notapor taragui » Mar Jul 11, 2017 8:25 am

http://coinmarketcap.com/all/views/all/

Hay casi 1000 criptomonedas. :o
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Re: BitCoins y nuevos modelos de intercambio

Notapor Dr.House » Sab Jul 01, 2017 2:54 pm

Beyond Bitcoin: How Blockchain Is Changing Banking
The digital currency has taken off this year, nearly tripling in price.

By AVI SALZMAN
July 1, 2017 2:27 a.m. ET
Barron's Graphics
The hottest investment of the first half of the year wasn’t Amazon.com, Netflix, or even Tesla. In fact, your broker probably isn’t pitching it, and it is barely even recognized by the Securities and Exchange Commission. Yet cryptocurrencies—the most famous of which is Bitcoin—are shooting out the lights.

Investors who bought Bitcoin for $5 or less just five years ago are millionaires today, as its price has soared above $2,500. Unlucky ones have lost small fortunes simply by misplacing a password, much like leaving a suitcase full of cash at the train station. Bitcoin, which has nearly tripled in price this year alone, is blamed for fueling drug sales and for helping hackers wreak havoc on businesses and governments. On some days, its price swings 20% up or down, often on a whim or a rumor. (See related story: “How to Invest in Bitcoin.”

It’s easy to dismiss the digital currency as an outlandish, even dangerous, fad. Don’t.

Even if Bitcoin ultimately falls apart or crashes, its underlying technology—known as “blockchain”—is likely to disrupt financial markets for years to come.

A blockchain is a digital ledger that is kept and validated simultaneously by a network of computers, almost like a shared Excel document that no one person can change without the agreement of the others. Importantly, it allows deals to be made without the blessing of a “trusted intermediary,” such as a clearinghouse.

Companies are already using blockchain technology to send payments and redesign how trades are settled. Financial giants like JPMorgan Chase (ticker: JPM) and Bank of America (BAC) could save billions by standardizing their record-keeping for all sorts of financial processes—at a time when they have come under increasing pressure to raise margins and cut costs. And it shows promise in other areas, from insurance to medical record-keeping to energy trading. Even traditionally conservative financial companies are speaking of the technology in world-changing terms.

“Blockchain technology isn’t just a more efficient way to settle securities,” said Fidelity Investments Chairman and CEO Abby Johnson at a blockchain conference in May. “It will fundamentally change market structures—and maybe even the architecture of the internet itself.” Johnson has a unique viewpoint: She’s even “mined” Bitcoin herself.

BITCOIN IS MORE THAN CASH you can trade over the internet. Unlike traditional currencies, the supply of which is controlled by central banks, new Bitcoins are mined about every 10 minutes by a global network of computers that maintain a constantly updated list of Bitcoin transactions. (The network itself is also called Bitcoin.)

Illustration Jay Zehngebot
Theoretically, anyone can become a Bitcoin miner by hooking their computer into the Bitcoin market, but there’s little chance they’ll win many Bitcoins. The mining business is dominated by Chinese operations that use specialized equipment to quickly complete the complicated mathematical tasks of verifying transactions.

There is no physical token involved—Bitcoin owners get codes, or “keys,” to access their money. The keys that each party enters allow the system to verify the transaction and memorialize it in a block. Only 21 million Bitcoins will ever be created (16.4 million of them have already been mined), so no central authority can devalue the currency.

Bitcoin was not the first idea for a digital, or “crypto,” currency. For at least a decade before it was created, libertarian-minded tech enthusiasts had dreamed of inventing a digital token that would allow them to trade directly with each other and avoid interference from central banks and regulators. Yet early efforts failed to catch on.

In 2008, in the heat of the financial crisis, a programmer or programmers using the name Satoshi Nakamoto shared an idea for a currency called Bitcoin on an online message board. Bitcoin’s key innovation is that it allows people to trade with each other without relying on a trusted intermediary, a strong selling point at a time when a growing number of people distrusted the institutions that were supposed to protect their money.

For some people, finding Bitcoin was a eureka moment. “I felt like I had stumbled across a really big idea that had the potential to be really important, but I also realized it would take years for something like Bitcoin to prove itself worthy of people’s trust,” wrote Gavin Andresen, a very early Bitcoin proponent, in an email to Barron’s. Andresen, a Massachusetts software developer, quickly became one of Bitcoin’s most prominent figures. In 2011, Nakamoto, just before ending public communication, appointed him as Bitcoin’s lead developer.


Bitcoin was beset by controversy and fraud from early on. People who didn’t want to mine Bitcoin by connecting their computers to the Bitcoin network often bought and traded them on exchanges, which were easily corruptible. The largest of them, named Mt. Gox, “lost” 850,000 Bitcoins (some were recovered), worth $450 million at the time and $2.2 billion today, and filed for bankruptcy in 2014.

Criminals quickly realized Bitcoin’s potential, too. A vast Bitcoin-fueled drug-dealing operation called Silk Road briefly thrived, then imploded. Hackers and blackmailers have demanded ransom in it.

All this could have destroyed Bitcoin, particularly if the U.S. government had stepped in to regulate it. But the Bitcoin network itself proved resilient to hacking and other chicanery—and its core users were in it for the long haul. “Most of us expected (and still expect) that Bitcoin would be a long-term project, not a get-rich-quick scheme,” Andresen writes.

IN THE EARLY DAYS, Andresen literally gave away Bitcoins in order to spur interest. Not anymore. One Bitcoin fetched eight cents in 2010. Last week, Bitcoins were trading for $2,550, up 170% since the start of the year. Clearly, investors are speculating on Bitcoin; many view it as an asset that, like gold, has a low correlation to the rest of the economy.

But Bitcoin is also rising because it has gradually gotten more useful and accepted. Stephen Pair, the CEO of Bitcoin payment-processor BitPay, says he was “happy to get five or 10 transactions a day” when he co-founded the company in 2011. “Today, we’re doing around 8,000 per day, on average.” Expedia (EXPE) and Overstock.com (OSTK) accept Bitcoin, and people sometimes use it to buy houses and cars. In general, though, your local grocery clerk or tailor isn’t accepting it, and perhaps never will.

In the U.S., about 0.5% to 0.75% of the adult population—roughly 1.2 million to 1.9 million people—have used Bitcoin, according to Scott Schuh, director of the Consumer Payments Research Center at the Boston Federal Reserve. “We’re not finding that the adoption rate is growing very fast,” he says. Bitcoin has gotten a better reception in some places overseas, where central banks have devalued the local currency. In fact, BitPay pays its employees in Argentina in Bitcoin.

Lately, Bitcoin has been suffering growing pains. Its network is too slow to handle the number of transactions people are attempting to process, forcing users to pay fees if they want their payments to go through. Only five to eight blockchain transactions can be processed per second, while credit-card networks process 10,000 times as many, according to a Goldman Sachs report. Absent a major change to the underlying Bitcoin code, the subject of a fierce debate among adherents, the cryptocurrency will be too illiquid to use for daily purchases, and will mostly be a store of value—a bar of gold instead of a Visa card.


(CLICK TO SEE A LARGER VERSION OF THE TABLE.)

The government, for its part, hasn’t even settled on what Bitcoin is. The Internal Revenue Service considers it an asset; the Commodity Futures Trading Commission says it’s a commodity; and Treasury Department regulators have described it as a “virtual currency.” Fed Chair Janet Yellen has said the agency has no authority to oversee Bitcoin, but has encouraged central bankers to study it. The SEC didn’t respond to Barron’s question about how the new administration will handle cryptocurrencies.

FOR INVESTORS, buying Bitcoin is a major gamble. There are few options beyond purchasing Bitcoins themselves or shares of the Bitcoin Investment Trust (GBTC), an over-the-counter security that tracks the price of Bitcoin (see “How to Invest in Bitcoin”). The SEC rejected an application by Cameron and Tyler Winklevoss, famous for suing Mark Zuckerberg over Facebook, to create a Bitcoin exchange-traded fund—the Winklevoss Bitcoin Trust—though the decision is being reviewed.

Meanwhile, entrepreneurs have come out with other digital coins that mimic Bitcoin’s structure, with some differences. The value of the most popular offshoot, a cryptocurrency called Ethereum, has risen to $300 from about $10 at the start of the year—a 3,000% rise. (Its market value is about $27 billion, versus $42 billion for Bitcoin.) Like Bitcoin, it’s extremely volatile, and even had a “flash crash” last month, when it briefly traded for 10 cents.

Yet Ethereum is much more than a coin. The blockchain network it runs on allows people to embed complicated information, including “smart contracts” that turn contractual terms into computer code and govern how they are executed.

“The sky is the limit in what I can express” with a smart contract, said Grainne McNamara, who runs financial blockchain programs for PwC, at an SEC conference in November. “I can write a check that says, ‘Look, I’d like to fund your Kickstarter, I’d like to give you $5,000, but only if you have raised the $5 million that it’s going to take you to shoot your new indie film. Otherwise, the money reverts back to me.’”

The Ethereum platform is so useful that JPMorgan Chase, Microsoft (MSFT), and dozens of other companies have formed an Enterprise Ethereum Alliance—yes, it sounds like something out of DC Comics—to explore its potential.

THE SUCCESS OF BITCOIN AND ETHEREUM has convinced others to launch their own “initial coin offerings,” some of which have raised tens of millions of dollars on little more than promises. The new coinmakers often say they’ll create a product tied to the coin and give coinholders preferential treatment. But there’s no guarantee a product will ever appear, and it’s starting to resemble a mania—Massachusetts Institute of Technology Professor Christian Catalini warns that we’re headed for a “dot-coin bubble.”

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“Given the enthusiasm and the levels and amount of money that have been raised, it’s almost inevitable,” he said in an interview.

BUBBLES? DRUG MARKETPLACES? Malicious hackers? How is it possible that anyone in the traditional banking industry is interested in this stuff?

In the post-Napster, post-Uber world, Wall Street no longer has the option of ignoring technologies whose legality or utility isn’t immediately clear. That doesn’t mean that U.S. banks have started trading Bitcoin. Few, if any, will touch it, in part because they can’t effectively comply with “know your customer” laws.

The financial institution that has seemed most interested in experimenting with Bitcoin is Fidelity, which allows employees to use the currency in its cafeteria and invites guest Bitcoin lecturers to its Bits + Blocks Club. Fidelity Charitable helps clients turn their Bitcoins into tax-advantaged charitable donations.

Fidelity will soon allow people who hold Bitcoin through a company called Coinbase to see their balances in their Fidelity account, although the customers will have to leave the Fidelity site to actually transact in it.

STILL, FEW EXPECT that Bitcoin will find a place in the traditional finance system anytime soon. Instead, entrepreneurs are harnessing the underlying technology to change finance.

By 2014, startups were already designing financial products that used blockchain technology with no direct connection to Bitcoin. Their pitch to bank executives: The new tech could speed up several back-office operations, such as settling trades or making cross-border payments, and make these activities cheaper. And unlike Bitcoin—whose users need no permission to enter the network—blockchains can also be closed to the public, creating a system that users can access only with explicit permission. That makes it secure enough to operate in the tightly regulated world of finance. Also, while Bitcoin transactions can be anonymous, blockchains can be designed to be transparent, so every transaction is easily linked to a person or corporation.

“That was the tipping point,” says Julio Faura, an executive at Banco Santander (SAN) who first became aware of blockchain’s promise in 2014. Faura got his Ph.D. in electrical engineering and designed computer chips before getting his M.B.A. He is now the head of research and development at Santander, leading the bank’s blockchain efforts.

“The rails on top of which the financial system was built—those rails are not broken,” Faura says. “They do work. It’s just that they are old. Our job was to see how this could help build a better financial infrastructure, rather than disrupting the world of finance.”

Santander has been a leader in testing and adopting the new technology. It has partnered with a company called Ripple that allows employees to send cross-border payments, an innovation that cut processing times to hours from days.

Bank of America Merrill Lynch and others are also partnering with Ripple.

While financial trades happen virtually instantaneously, the process to settle them remains slow and cumbersome. It often takes days to actually exchange assets, and financial counterparties tend to use different systems to settle accounts, which can make disputes particularly thorny.

Speeding up transactions and encasing them in a shared blockchain could save financial institutions $15 billion to $35 billion per year, according to Bain & Co. And it could actually make those transactions more secure, because the true record is kept by all participants. “Architecturally, it does not depend on just one, but on a community of people,” says Faura. “There is no single point of failure.”

THE DEPOSITORY TRUST & Clearing Corp., or DTCC, and its precursors have been settling trades since the 1970s, giving brokers a central clearinghouse to exchange securities. The DTCC is now working with IBM (IBM) and two startups named Axoni and R3 to put the $11 trillion credit-default-swap market on a distributed ledger similar to a blockchain. (A distributed ledger is an umbrella term for technologies, including blockchain, where computers certify transactions in a shared record.)

That credit-default-swap ledger should be operational by next year. The DTCC is also redesigning the $3-trillion-a-day U.S. Treasury repo market after completing a successful test with tech firm Digital Asset.

There have also been some experiments in share-trading. Overstock.com announced late last year that it had issued public securities on a blockchain. Nasdaq, too, has created a blockchain to trade shares, although its experiment was in the private market. Under Nasdaq’s system, developed with a company called Chain, private companies transferred shares without having to keep a literal paper trail, as many do today.

The pilot program was successful, says Fredrik Voss, who oversees the blockchain programs at Nasdaq. The exchange is now considering whether to open this option up to more clients. “The tech is there,” he adds in an interview.

Nasdaq’s experiments are not limited to trading shares: The company is also creating an exchange using blockchain that allows advertisers to buy, sell, and trade ad inventory. And it has put together a proxy voting platform in Estonia that lets shareholders vote on the internet, which “successfully demonstrated how a blockchain could be used for something other than transaction settlement.”

Other companies are embarking on similarly ambitious projects.

IBM last week announced that it will work with seven European banks, including Deutsche Bank (DB), to conduct trade-finance transactions—which now can take weeks and reams of paper—on a blockchain.

Elsewhere, blockchains are being tested to store medical records. The technology has even been employed in esoteric smaller-scale projects, like a solar electricity trading platform in one Brooklyn, N.Y., neighborhood.

VOSS IS OPTIMISTIC that blockchains will gain wider adoption, but he says that financial firms need more guidance from regulators. How will different governments treat cross-border payments made over closed networks? What information needs to be embedded in each trade or contract? What’s the right balance between security and privacy? “The world is full of these legal questions right now,” Voss says. “For people to commit billions to this, we need more guidance.”

More market players need to become involved in blockchain-powered exchanges to make them worthwhile. “This is a technology that’s not about building a faster engine for us,” he adds. “It’s about building a new road. If no one else is using it, there’s no use in having it.”

Banks are also reluctant to commit too many staff members or too much hardware to the projects, knowing that the first movers in blockchain—the ones who create the rails—will absorb most of the initial risk and upfront costs.

Indeed, much of Wall Street remains reticent. Bain surveyed executives at financial firms and found that about 80% expected the technology to be transformative and see their firms using it in some form by 2020. Still, they’re sketchy on where exactly they’ll deploy it at a time when older technologies still work.

One executive in a blockchain consortium with other companies told Bain that “half of the people in the group are looking for a solution; the other half are there uniquely to obstruct progress.”

“If there’s a consortium working on some sort of new cool solution, but that will threaten your existing business, people will try to steer it one way or the other or potentially delay it while they work on their own solution,” Thomas Olsen, a Bain blockchain expert, said in an interview. “There’s some of that going on right now.”

EXECUTIVES KNOW they need to understand blockchain, but not everyone is clear yet on how exactly it will help their business. Payment-processing company WEX surveyed 500 chief financial officers, and nearly two-thirds said they had a strong understanding of the technology. But only six explained how they were actually putting it into practice.

Nonetheless, Olsen expects blockchain to gain wider acceptance soon, spreading in a “piecemeal” fashion, rather than a “big bang” like how Uber changed taxi service.

What’s true of Bitcoin—and really all money—is true of blockchain too: It has value only inasmuch as everyone believes it has value. Then, perhaps, the sky’s the limit.
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Re: BitCoins y nuevos modelos de intercambio

Notapor Dr.House » Mié Jun 28, 2017 5:51 pm

4 HOURS AGO
By William Suberg
World Economic Forum Blockchain White Paper Gets Warm Reception

4026 Total views 136 Total shares
World Economic Forum Blockchain White Paper Gets Warm Reception
The World Economic Forum (WEF) today published a dedicated Blockchain report detailing how the technology will flow into the global economy.

Described as a white paper, Realizing the Potential of Blockchain provides background and suggestions as to how Blockchain will propagate throughout the world’s infrastructure.

From business to regulation, how disruptive innovation can be harnessed is forming an increasingly debated topic for international enterprises.

“This report helps us to understand that a distributed blockchain ecosystem need not be a disorganized one, and improved governance need not imply formal governmental legislation or regulation,” WEF Managing Board Member Richard Samans commented in a press release about the white paper.

While the WEF is often synonymous with the phrase “distributed ledger” - a euphemism for centralized private Blockchains popular with major financial institutions - the cryptocurrency community was also broadly receptive to the white paper’s content.

“This report will provide enormous value to technology companies, government agencies, NGOs and user organizations everywhere,” Chamber of Digital Commerce President Perianne Boring said.

“...Anyone who cares about the future of the blockchain ecosystem should read this report and heed its wisdom.”

The white paper was coauthored by Alex Tapscott, a notable figure in the Blockchain investment sector whose previous work includes the founding of the Blockchain Research Institute, focusing specifically on use cases for the technology.

Blockchain News
World Economic Forum
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54 MIN AGO
By Kari Stray
Non-Financial Blockchains - Where to Find Them

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Non-Financial Blockchains - Where to Find Them
So far, Blockchain technology has been mostly implemented in real use cases in finance and the economy, while other spheres remained underexploited. But as time goes by, more and more projects begin cropping up in industries unrelated to finance.

Cointelegraph has already published articles on the use of Blockchain technology in the food, tourism, healthcare and energy industries and even distributed computation. Some of these use cases are quite raw and need a lot of work before they become feasible.

Let’s instead take a look at the cases where Blockchain solutions are more fleshed out.

Healthcare
The first sphere that deserves our attention is medicine. No doubt, just thinking about all the piles of paperwork that you have to deal with when taking care of your health, it’s enough to make you actually sick - and that’s just your paperwork. Now imagine how many patients attend any given hospital and how many files are being stored and managed there. The legacy record-keeping systems are not on par with the constantly growing numbers of people.

What if all the needed information on every patient would be stored at a single place online? That would be a major development for the healthcare industry. Blockchain technology is one of the best ways to provide this easy-to-access, secure online catalog.

According to Thomas Keenan, professor of environmental design and computer science at the University of Calgary: “A transaction in a Blockchain doesn’t have to represent a Bitcoin or even money.” As he told in his interview, the technology provides anonymity and can be used almost in every industry.

Specifically, the professor encourages others to use Blockchain technology in healthcare.

Keenan says:

“In healthcare, the technology can be used for health records. In healthcare, a huge problem is that we want our health privacy but we also want the ER doctor to ‘know all about us’ immediately. Blockchain technology is capable of providing tamper-proof data management for medical records company. This can solve many problems for doctors, hospitals, insurance companies, lenders, and even patients.”

He mentions Factom, a Blockchain technology which provides a cataloging system for medical records. It cryptographically encrypts personal health info and protects the confidentiality of the patients.

Where to store medical data
Blockchain technologies can offer individuals a completely new and accurate way of storing their medical data. No state agency or private organization will be needed anymore to do the paperwork. Just imagine, all the information you need, you can get at home or from any other computer.

infographic

Patientory, a recently launched free-to-use app, is an example of Blockchain’s influence in this area. Users can create a profile in the app and keep track of their medical history. The app eliminates the chance of having this data suffer any kind of cyber attack. All the changes in the records can be seen online.

As a Blockchain-based application, Patientory employs their own cryptocurrency PTOY to provide some extra options for both doctors and patients. Doctors get private health information through the infrastructure on the Ethereum Blockchain. The patients will be allowed to buy extra storage space in the app for their info.

During its crowdsale on May 31, 2017, the company raised $7.2 mln. Patientory plans to become a “market network” so it’s important for them to distribute their cryptocurrency across a wide audience.

Blockchain revolution is a cutting edge development in medicine. It can easily guarantee the safety of one’s medical data and ensure better healthcare for the registered patients. When medical record-keeping starts running like a clock, many health problems won’t even appear in our lives.

Public services
Moving past healthcare, let’s take a look at the projects in the public services industry. After all, it’s just as important for a comfortable life.

From a technical position, we can find that some important data concerning our lives has been sealed from us. Not only does it complicate the situation, but it also sounds unfair. Transferring this data on a Blockchain would allow us to share it with third parties in case they are trusted. At the same time, the technology would ensure that all the info stays authentic and confidential.

Blockchain technology can simplify the information flow and make it easier for the relevant government agencies to access it. For example, banks and insurance companies have shown superior interest in it. Some prototypes have already been tested.

Nick Williamson, the CEO of Credits, a London-based Blockchain infrastructure provider, also reports that a larger percentage of use-cases involving Blockchain will be non-financial. That’s why the British government started examining if Blockchain could be helpful in tracking and distributing welfare and pension payments.

The Five Star Movement, the biggest Italian opposition group, also maintains this idea as it wants Blockchain to be used to upgrade and put public services in order. Step by step, it becomes clear that governments are opening up to new technologies. They even fund some specific projects in order to speed up the process of change.

The pros of non-financial Blockchain apps
Adopting Blockchain in various applications can save time and effort in the long run.

Additionally, these solutions can be environmentally-friendly, as they eliminate huge amounts of paperwork - it is reported, that the US government alone wastes more than $440 mln worth of paper each year. Blockchain can be used to protect identity and keep sensitive data safe from any hacking attempts.

All in all, non-financial Blockchain applications are a wide industry in need of further research. Soon we will see even more great projects come to life.

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Re: BitCoins y nuevos modelos de intercambio

Notapor Dr.House » Mié Jun 28, 2017 7:45 am

semiosis escribió:Hay muchas cosas todo lo que se está haciendo con Ethernum es muy interesante. Las ICO y su relación con las startups, donde hay toda una nueva manera de fondearse. Están apareciendo nuevos y revolucionarios usos, no habia visto esa vieja replica de ferzysz y no tengo tiempo de contestar en detalle. Pero desde lo que lo hablamos a ahora la realidad que el mercado se multiplico x 10 y aparecieron nuevos usos con los cuales ni imaginábamos en ese momento. Mucha de la gente mas inteligente del planeta esta metida con esto, y seria raro que no sigan innovando.
El nivel de innovación de hecho que hay es tan grande que es muy dificil seguirle el ritmo y uno tiene a sobresimplificarlo relacionándolo con lo que uno conoce. Pero acá se está inventando lo desconocido, no sabemos hasta donde va a llegar, de hecho lo comparamos con una moneda cuando las funciones van hacia cosas muy diferentes como los crowdjury con tecnologías blockchain. Navegadores web basados en esto para dar recompensan dentro de lo que llaman attention economy. Tambien puede pasar en la evolucion que aparezca algo nuevo aun mejor que ahora no vemos y todo esto quede obsoleto. Pero a lo que yo iba es que algo está pasado y no es solo una moda, esto de alguna forma va a terminar calando ondo en la sociedad, como en su momento lo fue Internet, de hecho blockchain la consideran la tecnologia para Internet 3.0.


El blockchain es lo que va a cambiar todo me parece.
Asi como podes pagar peer to peer desde tu casa y en forma anonima, con la tecnologia blockchain podrias votar desde tu casa en forma inalterable.
Logicamente va a ocurrir primero en Noruega antes que en Argentina.
Ayer me entere que ya hay "granjas" para minar bitcoins en Buenos Aires aprovechando los subsidios a la electricidad.
Minar es un proceso de potencia de calculo+consumo de energia.
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Dr.House
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Re: BitCoins y nuevos modelos de intercambio

Notapor semiosis » Mié Jun 28, 2017 1:05 am

Hay muchas cosas todo lo que se está haciendo con Ethernum es muy interesante. Las ICO y su relación con las startups, donde hay toda una nueva manera de fondearse. Están apareciendo nuevos y revolucionarios usos, no habia visto esa vieja replica de ferzysz y no tengo tiempo de contestar en detalle. Pero desde lo que lo hablamos a ahora la realidad que el mercado se multiplico x 10 y aparecieron nuevos usos con los cuales ni imaginábamos en ese momento. Mucha de la gente mas inteligente del planeta esta metida con esto, y seria raro que no sigan innovando.
El nivel de innovación de hecho que hay es tan grande que es muy dificil seguirle el ritmo y uno tiene a sobresimplificarlo relacionándolo con lo que uno conoce. Pero acá se está inventando lo desconocido, no sabemos hasta donde va a llegar, de hecho lo comparamos con una moneda cuando las funciones van hacia cosas muy diferentes como los crowdjury con tecnologías blockchain. Navegadores web basados en esto para dar recompensan dentro de lo que llaman attention economy. Tambien puede pasar en la evolucion que aparezca algo nuevo aun mejor que ahora no vemos y todo esto quede obsoleto. Pero a lo que yo iba es que algo está pasado y no es solo una moda, esto de alguna forma va a terminar calando ondo en la sociedad, como en su momento lo fue Internet, de hecho blockchain la consideran la tecnologia para Internet 3.0.
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Re: BitCoins y nuevos modelos de intercambio

Notapor Lucio » Mar Jun 27, 2017 4:13 pm

Leí bastante de lo que escribieron en este tema, y los aportes de ferdyzx, semiosis y Dr.House, me parecen sumamente enriquecedores.

No pretendo siquiera acercarme a terminar de comprender lo profundo de sus análisis, y de hecho me gustaría saber algo más de su formación para poder seguirlos. Hablando de valor, sus comentarios tienen valor en si mismos como para que escriban sobre el tema o den alguna conferencia y cobren por ello si el tiempo se los permite.

Sin perjuicio de ello, creo que lo que trasluce a todos, es una doble noción de “algo que no sabemos al detalle qué es” y que “cierta cantidad de gente le dará valor por cierta cantidad de tiempo”.

En ese sentido me parece que las criptomonedas como cualquier otro bien, tiene fundamentos (mejores o peores) y también oportunidades (técnicas). Si fuera el juego de las sillas, la música está sonando… cada uno podrá mejorar su análisis para saber por cuánto tiempo… creo que eso discuten.

En lo personal no tengo intención de invertir en algo que no entiendo, aún cuando a todo el resto le parezca el mejor negocio. Bastante me cuesta participar en los mercados que creo que entiendo.

Ahora si es por apostar algo que sobre…. mejor esto que la rula
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Re: BitCoins y nuevos modelos de intercambio

Notapor Lucio » Mar Jun 27, 2017 4:13 pm

Leí bastante de lo que escribieron en este tema, y los aportes de ferdyzx, semiosis y Dr.House, me parecen sumamente enriquecedores.

No pretendo siquiera acercarme a terminar de comprender lo profundo de sus análisis, y de hecho me gustaría saber algo más de su formación para poder seguirlos. Hablando de valor, sus comentarios tienen valor en si mismos como para que escriban sobre el tema o den alguna conferencia y cobren por ello si el tiempo se los permite.

Sin perjuicio de ello, creo que lo que trasluce a todos, es una doble noción de “algo que no sabemos al detalle qué es” y que “cierta cantidad de gente le dará valor por cierta cantidad de tiempo”.

En ese sentido me parece que las criptomonedas como cualquier otro bien, tiene fundamentos (mejores o peores) y también oportunidades (técnicas). Si fuera el juego de las sillas, la música está sonando… cada uno podrá mejorar su análisis para saber por cuánto tiempo… creo que eso discuten.

En lo personal no tengo intención de invertir en algo que no entiendo, aún cuando a todo el resto le parezca el mejor negocio. Bastante me cuesta participar en los mercados que creo que entiendo.

Ahora si es por apostar algo que sobre…. mejor esto que la rula
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Re: BitCoins y nuevos modelos de intercambio

Notapor Dr.House » Mar Jun 27, 2017 2:54 pm

Nvidia to launch graphics cards specifically designed for digital currency mining
Nvidia will release graphic cards specifically designed for cryptocurrency mining through its partners, according to a source familiar with the matter.
Read more: http://www.cnbc.com/id/104554373
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Re: BitCoins y nuevos modelos de intercambio

Notapor Dr.House » Mar Jun 27, 2017 7:15 am

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Re: BitCoins y nuevos modelos de intercambio

Notapor Boru » Lun Jun 26, 2017 10:56 pm

MCM escribió:Es verdad. Tiene esa utilidad. Actualmente la usan para transferir fondos evitando controles.

Respecto de la última pregunta, suponiendo que sean declaradas ilegales... y querés comprar, ¿cómo pensás pagarlas? ¿Con transferencias, o con tarjeta de crédito? Y si las vendés, ¿qué banco te acreditaría los u$s, dado ese origen?

En operaciones cara a cara o en cuevas, en efectivo. De igual forma que los dólares se operan informalmente aunque esté prohibido, pero más fácil.
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Boru
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Re: BitCoins y nuevos modelos de intercambio

Notapor Boru » Lun Jun 26, 2017 10:56 pm

Sr. Fangote escribió:Es un dolor de huevos pero la supremacia del dolar seguira, y estas monedas si su utilidad es la de secuestros de computadoras las van a terminar prohibiendo pero cuando esta burbuja se pinche ahi quedara un minimo de inversores ... es pura timba esta seudo moneda y su utilidad de moneda de cambio me cuesta creerlo que se puede comprar,

Ya se sabe desde hace años que estas monedas se usan para actividades ilegales, al igual que los mercados de la darknet, pero parece que no están pudiendo o queriendo erradicarlos.
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